Debates continue on whether the drinking age should be changed

Drinking under 21 has become a problem.

www.cdc.gov

Drinking under 21 has become a problem.

Bethany Tomblin, Editor-in-Chief in training

The legal drinking age in the United States is 21 and there have been debates whether or not it should be lowered. What people don’t realize is the effect it will have on the country if a law were to be passed giving minors the legal right to drink.
After a lot of research, medical professionals say that it can interfere with the development of a young adult’s brain. Drinking under the age of 21 causes conditions like addiction, depression and risk taking behavior to be more likely to occur.
One-third of all drunk driving accidents happen to people between the ages of 16 and 20. If a law were to be passed, that statistic could climb to an ungodly number.
Alcohol is the most widely used substance of abuse with American youth. Being in a car crash is the number one cause of death for teens; a quarter of those crashes involve an underage drinking driver.
It has been said that keeping the legal drinking rate to 21 saves 900 lives per year. Millennials argue that keeping this law has not stopped underage drinking and has only caused underage binge drinking behind closed doors, without supervision.
The truth is, people will break laws but when the law is not put into place, that is when lives become more at risk. I believe that this law should be thought and presented more seriously. The lives of millions could be saved if we just stood together and protected our laws and rights.