“Magnus Chase” Book One Review

This time Riordan is tackling Norse mythology.

rickriordanbooklist.com

This time Riordan is tackling Norse mythology.

Jesten Richardson, Assisstant Editor

As a die-hard Rick Riordan fan, I can safely say that I’ve stayed up all night to read and to fan-girl over every book that he’s ever written for my age group. Rather it be from the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series, the Kane Chronicles series or the Heroes of Olympus series, I could describe each book’s cover and placement in the series without looking, and could also list the personality traits of every character in it. I know at least a few people at Cabell Midland can relate to my level of “cool” (heart-warming dorkiness) and those few people at Cabell Midland were probably as ecstatic I was to learn that a new series was making its debut this October: a Norse mythology addition to the family named “Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard: the Sword of Summer”.
“The Sword of Summer” is the story of 16-year-old Magnus Chase, a boy that has been living on the streets in the two years since his mother was killed in a rather peculiar and traumatizing way. Magnus’s life is definitely not easy; he has to steal everything that he needs, and his only two allies are fellow homeless people Hearth and Blitz. Magnus’s concerns don’t really extend past keeping himself alive and in one piece, until a run in with some surprising family members and a fiery fiend lead to some shocking new revelations about his past. Suddenly, the possibility that Magnus is akin to a whole smattering of Norse gods and demigods doesn’t seem so outlandish, and a whole new load of problems is added to his plate as he struggles to come to grips with the newer version of himself.
Let me just start by stating the versatility of the series. For those who haven’t read the other series but have an extreme interest in Norse mythology and for those who are a little wary of the idea of another mythology series that is not directly linked to Percy Jackson, I bring you good tidings. The series are connected in a significant way, Percy Jackson fans, and the series is also not so significantly connected that you cannot understand it without the aid of the Greek/Roman side of things, non-Percy Jackson fans. The book can be read either way, and it is extremely enthralling either way with the fantastic, yet sneakily educational, plot and that signature humor that graces Rick Riordan’s work though he is a 51-year-old man from Texas. I thoroughly recommend this book to anyone that enjoys past books by this author, awesome action, witty dialogue or extremely complex characters that I won’t mention so that you can find out for yourself how much better they are than others you’ve seen.