“Something Wicked This Way Comes” Play Review

Students at Cabell Midland attended the production put on by the drama department.

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Students at Cabell Midland attended the production put on by the drama department.

Jesten Richardson, Assisstant Editor

I, like a notable amount of students, went into Cabell Midland’s second performance of “Something Wicked This Way Comes” with no prior knowledge of the play except that it alluded to Shakespeare. Because of my lack of experience with the work, I can’t compare it to other productions, so I will provide an honest review by the untrained eye.
To start, I must say that the acting was wholly fantastic. I was very much impressed by the performances of seniors Ryan Sutphin and Kara Legg in their diabolical roles of carnie and witch. According to a junior friend of mine, Nik Ferrel, the play was improved by Legg’s “table-turning” performance; I agree that Legg’s ability to flip a table with little effort, and an even smaller time frame, was remarkable. The intensity that Sutphin brought to the stage was equally necessary, yet it was more surprising, as he is known for his fun personality and boyish charm by some friends. My favorite part of the production was probably when Sutphin was tearing up a “bible” (ordinary magazine) and threatening the father (senior Spencer Nicholas) of young adventurer/troublemaker Will Halloway (freshman Jaccob Bailey). Hard work was showcased by every actor and actress in the production, and the actors, along with the superior stage crew and sets, made for an almost flawless production.
Unfortunately, I am in no state of mind to let major flaws go by unnoted. I know that I am not the only person in the audience that mourned the absence of a narrator to make sense of what was occurring. Perhaps if I had prior knowledge of the subject matter, not having an explanation would have been dismissible; however, many audience members approached me to note how confused they had become during the play. Enjoyment could still be found in the production, but narration would have taken it that much further.
Another flaw in the production was the audio, which did not stay consistent throughout the play. Perhaps others would not pick up on the discrepancies, but as the daughter of an audio guru, I could not overlook them. The music was always beautiful and at a proper volume, yet the voices of the actors themselves were often lost in the hum of the audience. Though it is undeniable that the audience members should remain quiet, it is also undeniable that the proper alterations were not made in the audio so the performers could be heard.
I will end my review by saying that I was very pleased by the play, despite my complaints. Overall, the production was full of intensity and feeling, and it was well executed for a high school production. I am very proud of the theatre department, and wish them luck in the future.